The discomfort and embarrassment of a prostate disease affects 60% of men between the ages of 40 and 60 and up to 80% of those who are 80 years old. Men should learn how to prevent an unhealty prostate
senone's Articles
September 17, 2007 by senone
In order to live a long as well as a happy life you should include high fiber fruits in your diet. And most of them would also agree in eating fruits which are rich in fiber. But many of them still don't have enough knowledge of exactly how they should add fruits with high fiber in their diets. Many health agencies are trying to educate the people by running different campaigns about the importance of high fiber fruits and how to add these fruits in your daily routine diet.

People generally k...
June 21, 2007 by senone
by Donald Saunders

Prostate problems will affect ninety percent of all men by the time the reach the age of eighty and in all too many cases the problem will be that of prostate cancer. But just what is the prostate gland and what does it mean to be diagnosed with prostate cancer? Here we look at the ten questions which are most often asked by men who encounter prostate problems.

1. What is the prostate gland and what does it do?

The prostate gland is situated between the bladder and th...
March 5, 2007 by senone
by Donald Saunders


Over the years there has been considerable debate about prostate cancer and the subject of prostate cancer prevention in particular remains somewhat controversial. Although, as with many cancers, men do not themselves cause the onset of prostate cancer, there are certainly a number of risk factors for developing the disease and there is a great deal that can be done, if not to prevent it, then certainly to reduce the risk of developing it.

The first step in preventing ...
March 1, 2007 by senone
by Adrian Jones


Despite the precautions taken to give the radiotherapy as accurately as possible there will always be some side effects associated with radiotherapy to the prostate gland even with "best treatment". This is partly because to reach the prostate gland from the outside the X-rays have to pass through normal tissues (bladder, bowel, skin) and partly because an area around the prostate gland needs to be treated in case the prostate is in a slightly different position each day (e....
February 22, 2007 by senone
by Joann Cheong

Rates of prostate cancer vary widely across the world. It is least common in South and East Asia, more common in Europe, though the rates vary widely between countries, and most common in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is least common among Asian men and most common among black men with figures for European men in between. However, these high rates may be affected by increasing rates of detection. Although prostate cancer can somet...
February 2, 2007 by senone
Men with low PSA (prostate specific antigen) levels on screening tests can still have prostate cancer, according to a study* released today by scientists from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the Southwest Oncology Group, an NCI-funded network of researchers. In this study, prostate cancers were detected by biopsy in men with normal PSA levels.

"The good news is that the vast majority of these cancers were low and intermediate grade, which ...
January 20, 2007 by senone
For some peculiar reason, whenever I address a health issue and my male friends are present, the discussion is quickly redirected to another subject as they try to avoid the discussion. I recently encountered the same phenomenon and one of my friends responded that men are feeling guilty of making mistakes when it comes to their health. From forgetting to eat their daily fruit and veggies indulging in a hamburger of French fries, to scheduling an appointment with the doctor only when the sympt...
January 20, 2007 by senone
While millions of people are slowly dying of hunger, modern societies have to face new challenges directly linked to our way of life. Bad nutritional habits, stress, junk food and other factors contribute day after day to a dramatic explosion of obesity. But how can the obesity of today, combined with an aging population have a direct impact on the next children generation? Although no real study has ever been performed on this subject, science already proved us that obesity can have negativ...
January 16, 2007 by senone
Drug development has produced many tales of important pharmaceuticals that originate in plants. Now scientists at the Indiana University School of Medicine want to write another, hoping to turn an extract from feverfew--an herb traditionally used as a treatment for migraine headaches--into a new tool to fight cancer.

The compound, parthenolide, may be a key to reducing the spread (metastasis) or the recurrence of several types of cancer, including breast, prostate, lung, bladder, leukemia...
January 14, 2007 by senone
A new American Cancer Society report says that men with diabetes seem to have a reduced risk of developing prostate cancer. The society's study tracked 72,000 men from 1992 to 2002 and found that men diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were less likely to also be diagnosed later with prostate cancer. Scientists say a drop in insulin levels among diabetes patients may be key to the lowered risk.

* Men with type 2 diabetes seem to be less likely to develop prostate cancer, overall, a new study indi...
January 13, 2007 by senone
If sex is the sweet part of a relationship, then orgasm has to be all that delightful chocolate they put in my favorite sweet things. Jokes aside, sex can be very accurately described as the glue that holds together the other aspects of a relationship between two people. And orgasm is the goal of every hot sex session. The pleasure that makes the tight worlds of intimate relationships go round.

What is less known is the fact that orgasms have certain health benefits attached to them. Indeed,...
January 10, 2007 by senone
After prostate cancer surgery, obese men are more likely than men with normal weight to have high levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a marker for cancer recurrence, according to a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers.

"Our results show that moderately and severely obese men were at an increased risk for high PSA levels after surgery and therefore are likely to have prostate cancer recurrence," said Stephen Freedland, M.D., instructor of urology at the Brady Urological Institute a...
January 10, 2007 by senone
The first longitudinal study of male orgasmic quality following radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) found that some men experience decreased orgasmic quality. Overall, orgasmic quality improved with increasing length of follow up. It has been known that RRP and other surgical procedures for the treatment of prostate cancer can negatively impact sexual function, but previous studies had focused solely on erectile and ejaculatory function issues. The study will be presented during a discussed p...
January 9, 2007 by senone




New research on genes linked to hereditary prostate cancer helps scientists better understand how prostate cancer grows. Tests to find abnormal prostate cancer genes could also help tell which men are at high risk. They could then be tested more often. Further research could provide answers about the chemical changes that lead to prostate cancer. Then, perhaps, we could design drugs to reverse those changes.

One of the biggest problems now facing doctors and their patients with...
January 6, 2007 by senone
Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers to be diagnosed in men. Unlike many other cancers, prostate cancer often grows very slowly and is difficult to detect for many years. A man with this disease may not exhibit any prostate cancer symptoms for some time.

Many men pass off prostate cancer symptoms as just signs of getting older. Aging men do experience many of the same symptoms as those with prostate cancer because of how both affect urination.

Prostate cancer symptoms include...